Partnering with family caregivers essential to Changing CARE

ChangingCare-themes
Changing CARE is aimed at addressing caregiver communication, assessment, recognition, and education.

Cathy Fooks, President and CEO

In August, we announced details on our new funding initiative, Changing CARE. Since then, we’ve seen an overwhelming response from every corner of the Ontario health care environment. This is evidenced by the nearly 400 participants in our Changing CARE webinars throughout August and September, and the 70 Expressions of Interest submissions we received last week. Furthermore, this response underscores the fact that family caregivers are being increasingly seen as essential health care stakeholders who have a role and need support.

What we found interesting through our engagement work, however, was the common feeling of helplessness from both caregivers and health care providers. Caregivers often said they didn’t know where to go for information and support and health care providers often said they didn’t know where to send them. Changing CARE aims to change this dynamic as well as others.

As a start, we’ve published a number of key reports that are meant to be resources for the field. This includes A Profile of Family Caregivers in Ontario, our Caregiver Resource Hub, and our Stories Shared, Voices Heard reports which outline findings from both our caregiver and health provider consultations gathered during The Caring Experience Project. These resources on our website provide a concrete starting point for anyone looking to improve the family caregiver experience.

It’s well known that caregiver burden is a real issue facing Ontario and that distress levels are rising. This needs to change.

Through our work leading up to Changing CARE, we discovered four broad themes that caregivers experience – challenges related to communication, recognition, assessment, and education.

We’ll be funding up to three projects in support of innovative ideas to improve the caregiver experience. Future system transformation is clearly predicated on families providing support in all aspects of patient care – if we don’t start building system capacity to partner with them now, no one will be well served. Not patients. Not families. Not providers.

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WHAT’S BEING SAID

Stephane is a young caregiver who assists with caring for his younger brother. Don has been caring for his wife since her diagnosis with early onset Alzheimer’s 5 years ago. Hear from Stephane & Don on what their #caregiving experiences have been like: bit.ly/2VuxJCK pic.twitter.com/FfZTG9IqkE