Changing CARE—Our time for action

CFooks 2We listened. We heard. Now it’s time for action.

That’s been our mantra for just over a month now with the launch of our new funding initiative, Changing CARE. We’ve done the legwork, and we’re ready to take action in Ontario’s health and community care sectors.

This past week was our deadline for Expression of Interest submissions for those organizations interested in being part of Changing CARE. We had over 400 people tune in to one of four webinars and have now received over 70 Expression of Interest (EOI) submissions as a result—now it’s on to the review process.  We heard from all parts of the system – family health teams, hospitals, LHINs and CCACs, and home and community care service agencies.

Similar to the PATH project before it, Changing CARE will bring family caregivers and providers together to spearhead innovative solutions that aim to improve family caregiver experiences in Ontario’s health and community care sector.

It’s on this note that our Top of Mind commentary piece makes a concerted call for better coordination of the various efforts being pioneered across Ontario aimed at family caregivers. At the Foundation, we’ve put a lot of work into better understanding the caregiver experience from the perspectives of caregivers themselves but also from front line staff and health care professionals.

Innovation, however, also needs to exist in policy and legislation, both in health care and in other environments. So, what action is being taken to support family caregivers on a policy front more broadly? To answer this question, we had Cayla Baarda, a Research Associate in the City of Toronto’s Urban Fellows Program and the Foundation’s summer Research Assistant, highlight three key legislative developments aimed at family caregivers.

Lastly, we also had the immense pleasure of providing eight young carers from the Niagara Region the opportunity to share their own caregiving stories in video format through a digital storytelling workshop. In the end, six decided to share their videos more widely and one of these young carers, 17-year-old Olivia Wyatt, is the focus of our latest caregiver feature written by Program Associate Catherine Monk-Saigal.

Stories like Olivia’s need to continue to be at the centre of any change in Ontario, especially as the health care system enters a period of flux. It’s also important to keep ourselves open to the new opportunities that might arise during this period and be willing to take actions that can lead to positive change.

As we launch Changing CARE, our plan is to do just that.

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Also from the Fall 2016 edition of Top of Mind:

Cathy Fooks, President and CEO In August, we announced details on our new funding initiative, Changing CARE. Since then,
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Cayla Baarda Over the last few years, governments around the world have started taking action to improve legislative and
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Catherine Monk-Saigal As long as she can remember Olivia Wyatt has been a caregiver to those around her. She
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WHAT’S BEING SAID

How do Ontario’s caregivers spend their #caregiving time? Find out in our latest report, Spotlight on Caregivers in Ontario – the first report of its kind in our province: bit.ly/2zRU6Jf #onhealth pic.twitter.com/OySgS1WRrV